REPORTS ON THE TROUBLES IN KANSAS - 1856 1st Ed. Bleeding Kansas Investigation
REPORTS ON THE TROUBLES IN KANSAS - 1856 1st Ed. Bleeding Kansas Investigation
REPORTS ON THE TROUBLES IN KANSAS - 1856 1st Ed. Bleeding Kansas Investigation
REPORTS ON THE TROUBLES IN KANSAS - 1856 1st Ed. Bleeding Kansas Investigation
REPORTS ON THE TROUBLES IN KANSAS - 1856 1st Ed. Bleeding Kansas Investigation
REPORTS ON THE TROUBLES IN KANSAS - 1856 1st Ed. Bleeding Kansas Investigation
REPORTS ON THE TROUBLES IN KANSAS - 1856 1st Ed. Bleeding Kansas Investigation
REPORTS ON THE TROUBLES IN KANSAS - 1856 1st Ed. Bleeding Kansas Investigation
REPORTS ON THE TROUBLES IN KANSAS - 1856 1st Ed. Bleeding Kansas Investigation

REPORTS ON THE TROUBLES IN KANSAS - 1856 1st Ed. Bleeding Kansas Investigation

Regular price $175.00 Sale

Oliver, Mordecai, et al., REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO INVESTIGATE THE TROUBLES IN KANSAS; WITH THE VIEWS OF THE MINORITY OF SAID COMMITTEE.  Washington: Cornelius Wendell, Printer, 1856. 

First edition brown cloth hardcover w/gilt titling and blind-stamped tooling on spine and boards, 8vo (9 x 5.875"), very good, n.a., vii,  pp.[1]- 132 pp., + [1]-1206 pp., rubbing, small chipping and wear to spine, board edges and corners, sporadic light staining, foxing, and spotting throughout, 1" sq. damp-stain to uppermost front edge of text block in the last 200 pages only.

 Printed under order of the U.S. House of Representatives, 34th Congress, 1st Session, Report No.200.  This rather large work was the product of a congressional committee charged with investigating the many troubles having risen up in the newly settled Kansas territory.  Evidence seems to suggest that Kansas began being settled in 1827 with the establishment of Fort Leavenworth. The pace of settlement accelerated in the 1850s, during a time of much political turmoil over the slavery debate.  Kansas territory was only officially opened to settlement with the Kansas- Nebraska act in 1854 - a mere two years before the printing of this book.  The area became a hot bed of discontent as abolitionist Free-Staters, predominantly from the New England area, and pro-slavery settlers, relocating from neighboring state of Missouri, rushed into the territory to help decide whether Kansas would become a free state or a slave state.  Countless encounters of violence and chaos erupted across the area as these forces collided.  The new territory became known as Bleeding Kansas. The abolitionists eventually prevailed, and on January 29, 1861, Kansas entered the Union as a free state - the last seven years being only a warm-up for the next four years of the American Civil War.

      Quite the amazing sector of Captured Tyme - a very distinctive and collectible book indeed.