LOSSING'S PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1900. Profusely Illustrated
LOSSING'S PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1900. Profusely Illustrated
LOSSING'S PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1900. Profusely Illustrated
LOSSING'S PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1900. Profusely Illustrated
LOSSING'S PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1900. Profusely Illustrated
LOSSING'S PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1900. Profusely Illustrated
LOSSING'S PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1900. Profusely Illustrated
LOSSING'S PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1900. Profusely Illustrated

LOSSING'S PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1900. Profusely Illustrated

Regular price $149.00 Sale

Lossing, Benson, PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Philadelphia: David McKay, Publisher, 1900.  Maroon cloth hardcovers w/gilt titling and vignette to spine, (3vols. of 3), 8vo (9.625x6.375"), Very good/n.a, Vol. 1 608 pp.,Vol. 2 640 pp., Vol. 3 640 pp., index. "Illustrated by nearly twelve hundred engravings on wood, by Lossing and Barritt, from sketches by the author and others," also many maps. Frontis at beginning of each volume, very light rubbing to head, tail and corners, spines sound but hinges of all three volumes have been repaired/strengthened with white hinge reinforcing tape.  Even with the sophistication these three tomes constitute a superb work on the subject presented. Though not the first edition, they are the best illustrated edition with hundreds of b/w lithographs. Quite the distinctive set of books indeed; a major sector of Captured Tyme!

Benson John Lossing (February 12, 1813 – June 3, 1891) was a prolific and popular American historian, known best for his illustrated books on the American Revolution and American Civil War and features in Harper's Magazine. He was a charter trustee of Vassar College.  Lossing's significance as a historian derives from his diligence in seeking out primary records, his interviews with participants of events and intimates of his biographical subjects, and his care to weigh and contrast details of his various sources.                                                                                                                         Although such efforts are today a standard among historians, in Lossing's time they were not. Historiography was not yet a discipline. Washington Irving, with whom he corresponded, wrote, "I have been gratified at finding how scrupulously attentive you have been to accuracy to facts, which is so essential in writings of an historical nature." This made him an essential secondary source for contemporary and succeeding historians and enough of an institution for Theodore Roosevelt in his "Naval War of 1812" to adduce simply "Lossing" in stating a fact, in the same manner as historians use the figure "Gibbon" or "Toynbee".