PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.

PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN, 1888 1st/1st 2vols.

Regular price $249.00 Sale

Sheridan, Philip H., PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF P. H. SHERIDAN. GENERAL UNITED STATES ARMY, New York: Charles L. Webster & Company, 1888.  Two volumes, both first edition, green cloth hardcovers with ornate gilt titling and furniture, 8vo (9 x 5.625"), Very Good / n.a., vol.1: x, [4], 500 pp. : 21 illustrations, 8 steel plates, 13 maps; vol.2: ix, [3], 486 pp. : 23 illustrations, 9 steel plates, 14 maps, index.  A wonderful example of this much collected tome; some faint transference from the frontis of both volumes in no way effecting the frontis or text, light rubbing to the high points of the boards as well as the head and tail of spine, corners bumped and rubbed, some light general speckling and general wear to boards in general, one small spot on the bottom of the text block of vol. 1 not affecting the text, a very light and appropriate general age toning to paper.  Quite the distinctive pair of books indeed - a true and wonderful sector of Captured Tyme!

           Philip Henry Sheridan (March 6, 1831 – August 5, 1888) was a career United States Army officer and a Union general in the American Civil War. His career was noted for his rapid rise to major general and his close association with General-in-chief Ulysses S. Grant, who transferred Sheridan from command of an infantry division in the Western Theater to lead the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac in the East. In 1864, he defeated Confederate forces under General Jubal Early in the Shenandoah Valley and his destruction of the economic infrastructure of the Valley, called "The Burning" by residents, was one of the first uses of scorched-earth tactics in the war. In 1865, his cavalry pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee and was instrumental in forcing his surrender at Appomattox Sheridan fought in later years in the Indian Wars of the Great Plains. Both as a soldier and private citizen, he was instrumental in the development and protection of Yellowstone National Park. In 1883, Sheridan was appointed general-in-chief of the U.S. Army, and in 1888 he was promoted to the rank of General of the Army during the term of President Grover Cleveland.